Electronic signs to provide real-time travel information to Sydney motorists


The Government of New South Wales has installed electronic message signs that will display travel time information to motorists in Sydney, Australia.  

Signs have been installed as part of the government’s A$225m ($171m) Pinch Points programme, which has been created to ease traffic congestion, as well as improve journey reliability on Sydney’s road network.

The new technology displays information to motorists such as the time that will be required for them to reach key landmarks or destinations.  

Electronic message signs displaying this new travel time information will be located across six corridors, which include Route A1 that covers Pacific Highway north corridor between Pennant Hills Road at Wahroonga and the Gore Hill Freeway at Artarmon.

Motorists in Sydney can also witness these electronic signs on Route A3 that spans King Georges Road/ Mona Vale Road corridor between Pittwater Road at Mona Vale and the Princes Highway at Blakehurst and on Route A4, which covers Great Western Highway corridor between the Bradfield Highway in the Sydney CBD and Russell Street at Emu Plains.

"The new technology displays information to motorists such as the time that will be required for them to reach key landmarks or destinations."

Other corridors include Route A8 Pittwater Road/ Condamine Street/ Spit Road/ Military Road corridor between Mona Vale Road at Mona Vale and the Warringah Expressway at Crows Nest.

Route A40m will be the sixth corridor, which covers Old Windsor Road/ Victoria Road corridor between Hills M2 Motorway at Seven Hills and the A4 Western Distributor/ City West Link at Rozelle. 

Currently, there are around 91 electronic message signs on Sydney motorways equipped with real-time travel information.

New South Wales Roads, Maritime and Freight Minister Melinda Pavey explained that the new initiative would help motorists in making better decisions about whether to continue along their chosen path or take an alternative route to reach their destination faster.


Image: NSW Government installs electronic message in Sydney. Photo: courtesy of NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet.