Young Driver, a unit of Young Driver Motor Cars Limited, has developed a specialist car for children between the age of five and ten in the UK.

Young Driver developed the two-seat electric vehicle (EV) that is not a toy but can actually be driven by kids under the age of ten.

The car features two electric engines, independent suspension, right or left-hand drive steering, disc brakes, and software that can not only identify oncoming obstacles but can also stop the car automatically in order to prevent collisions.

Young Driver EV, which is claimed to look similar to Toyota Camatte57s, will have the ability to reach a speed of up to 16km per hour, reported Car Advice.

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Disc brakes in the cars will ensure they can stop quickly and effectively whenever necessary. The mini EV has been designed by automotive designer Chris Johnson.

"Young Driver developed the two-seat electric vehicle (EV) that is not a toy but can actually be driven by kids under the age of ten."

Although the mini motor is installed with anti-collision software, parents can switch off the car with a remote control.

According to the company, though it is the slowest vehicle to be available in the market at present, the vehicle can actually help children avoid road accidents.

The car will be showcased at the The Gadget Show in April and will be launched in May. The company claims the car will not be allowed on real roads, but on a road system created by the company.

Young Driver managing director Kim Stanton was quoted by Motors.co.uk saying: "We have had children involved throughout its development, working with the designers and engineers to ensure that it provides a realistic driving experience.

"The ultimate aim is to give youngsters a greater insight in terms of road safety.

"By getting behind the wheel of a car, and tackling some day to day situations like junctions, passing cyclists and reversing, this age group will have a much clearer idea of how to protect themselves as pedestrians or on their bikes."